March Gardening Advice 2019

Ah at last! The days of Winter are well and truly behind us, well we hope anyway! We could be in for another late beast from the east so enjoy the warmer weather whilst you can and hope it sticks.

Continue to plant deciduous hedging plants, shrubs, trees and climbers. Stakes and rabbit guards should be put in place at the time of planting trees, to prevent damage to the rootball or bark. This is the best month for planting roses in heavy soils or in cold areas. Avoid planting in areas where roses were previously grown, otherwise new introductions may suffer from replant disease. Towards the end of the month, you can plant evergreen shrubs and trees left unplanted since the autumn.

In warmer areas, evergreen trees and shrubs can be moved in late March. It is better to wait until early April in colder areas. Make sure the soil is not waterlogged or frozen solid, and bear in mind that they will need careful attention to watering if they are to survive their first summer after moving.
taken from RHS

Bare root season is still in full swing and are the most affordable way of achieving a hedge. Deciduous hedging plants include popular species such as BeechAlder and Bird Cherry. If you are looking for some evergreen species, we suggest planting these towards the end of the month. In warmer areas, evergreen trees and shrubs can be moved in late March. It is better to wait until early April in colder areas. Make sure the soil is not waterlogged or frozen solid, and bear in mind that they will need careful attention to watering if they are to survive their first summer after moving. why not try BoxDaisy bush or Holly. When planting bare roots, we suggest using Rootgrow which is an organic mycorrhizal (pronounced my-cor-y-zal) fungi – a friendly fungi for plants which greatly promotes healthy growth. On our new website, there is an auto-calculation function that will tell you at the checkout the amount of Rootgrow you will need for the amount of hedging you are ordering. Clever hey!

Many summer or late-summer flowering deciduous shrubs can be pruned between January and March. Examples include Buddleja davidii, Caryopteris clandonensisCeratostigmaHydrangea paniculataLeycesteriaLavateraPerovskia, hardy fuchsia, and deciduous Ceanothus species.

Delay pruning spring-flowering shrubs until after they have flowered, otherwise this year’s display will be lost.

Do not prune slightly tender evergreen shrubs (such as Choisya, best left until April), but do tackle hardier examples (such as Prunus laurocerasus, the cherry laurel), if necessary.

Prune winter-flowering jasmine once the flowers have faded. Remove any dead or damaged shoots, tie in new shoots to the main framework, and then shorten all the laterals coming off the main framework to 5cm (2in), cutting to a bud. This will keep the plant neat, and improve flowering next year. It is a good idea to feed and mulch after pruning, as the plant will put on lots of growth in response to cutting back.

Summer-flowering jasmines may also be pruned (if necessary), providing that they are reasonably hardy in their situation. With these you should remove a couple of stems completely to ground level, and avoid cutting back laterals, as this would damage the current year’s flowering potential.
taken from RHS