Tackling Taxus Baccata

One of our best selling species is English Yew – or to use the latin name, Taxus Baccata.

It makes a beautiful dark green hedge and it’s slow growing so it’s very easy to maintain, giving a sharp edge when just trimmed.

It has another wonderful attribute in addition – which is the ability to re-generate from very hard pruning.

Often old hedges get a bit neglected and they can get too thick or full of weeds.   Not every species of hedging plant will recover from a very hard prune (by which I mean cutting back the width by up to 50%) but here are a couple of photos showing how this very old Yew hedge has recovered during the first and second year’s after a really severe prune (not that I’d really recommend that a hedge is treated this severely without being done by an expert!).   In the first year, the main stem of the plant – which is almost a tree trunk – is clearly visible and there’s a bit of nice new growth.

 

Yew hedge in first year after hard pruning

Yew hedge in first year after hard pruning

In the second year, the main stem is almost covered in lush new growth, and it’s back to being a hedge again.

Yew hedge in second year after hard pruning

Yew hedge in second year after hard pruning

Although Yew is the most expensive species we sell (because it’s so slow growing it takes years longer in the nursery to reach a decent height than most other species of hedging plant) it’s an aspect that’s worth thinking about for those investing in an important hedge (prestige properties for example).

June

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