Ordering Bare Root and Root Ball plants before the end of the season

February, for the Hedges Direct team in the sales office and the nursery and despatch teams, is when we get close to fever pitch (full fever pitch is March and April!).  These spring months are our busiest – whilst we will always do our best to keep our deliveries on a very swift turnaround timescale (thanks to our box carriers and our pallet company laying on extra vehicles), please give us as much notice as you can when placing orders.

The bare root season lasts until the end of March (weather permitting) but we stop taking orders for Beech (Fagus sylvatica), especially the taller plants, a little bit before the season ends because Beech is slightly more difficult to establish.  So, please please please don’t leave it until the end of March to place your order.  We also run out of some species in some sizes so if you’ve got a clear view of what plants you want please order in advance – we can reserve the plants and hold your order until you’re ready to have them delivered.

Don’t forget that planting with RootGrow improves the success rate of planting bare root plants and is particularly important for planting late in the season and even more so if you are planting taller plants.   Full blurb on the benefits are on the RootGrow page on our website – it is as good as it sounds.   RootGrow sent one of their team to see us recently – what we hadn’t quite realised is that the RootGrow fungi are grown quite naturally in greenhouses – it’s an amazing, completely organic product – nature harnessed by humans for the benefit of nature!  We think it’s best attribute is that it puts the roots in contact with 700 times more soil than if planted without RootGrow – I haven’t typed that wrong – 700 times more soil so that’s 700 x more nutrients and water.

The root ball season goes on a little longer – early to mid April normally – but all our root balls are large evergreens so the sooner they are planted the better.  They’re only available in the winter for a very good reason – they don’t like to be moved when it’s getting warm and dry.

Charlie, waiting eagerly for an adventurous walk!

When I started to write this blog I thought it would be mainly about pleasant walks with the dog and what we could see happening in hedgerows and formal hedges – but the poor dog’s hardly been out because we’ve been busy, busy, busy in the office – but I am resolved – fair’s fair – he’s good to me so I need to get him out for proper walks more often – all this chasing a ball around the grass outside the office is a poor substitute!

6 Responses to “Ordering Bare Root and Root Ball plants before the end of the season”

  • Stewart:

    Hello

    Can you tell me why you cannot plant Beech bare root plants in march?
    thanks

  • June:

    Hi Stewart

    You certainly can plant Beech bare root in March but you should be aware that Beech is slightly trickier to establish than some other bare root species – especially the taller plants over 1m – so it’s sensible not to leave it until very late March. The sooner it is planted the better. Hedges Direct normally, depending on the weather, stops selling tall Beech bare root about mid-March.

    June

  • Margaret T.:

    Who’s Charlie and how old is he? Is he neutered?

    Thanks,
    Margaret

  • June:

    Charlie is a 3 year old, neutered Cavalier King Charles Spaniel who thinks he’s human!
    He loves his walks down lanes lined with old hedgerows full of interesting smells for dogs and full of interesting growth for hedge enthusiasts.

    Lots more news of Charlie to come as we get into Spring”

    June

  • Eileen Culshaw:

    Charlie looks a lovely happy dog! I look forward to hearing more about him in future blogs

  • […] are hardy in Zones 5-8 and will produce fruit for 3 to 5 years. Strawberries need a full sunOrdering Bare Root and Root Ball plants before the end of the …February, for the Hedges Direct team in the sales office and the nursery and despatch teams, is when […]