Archive for March, 2011

Spring has sprung

New spring growth is now very evident.  The old dark green leaves on evergreens have bright light green tips – here’s Lonicera nitida as an example showing last year’s dark green leaves to the left of my fingers and this season’s new growth to the right.

Lonicera nitida

Lonicera nitida

Deciduous plants are pushing out their gorgeous new season growth – here’s Hawthorn  as an example,

Hawthorn

Hawthorn

and another not very good photograph of new Hornbeam leaves which are like little concertinas.

Hornbeam

Hornbeam

The new growth gives a softer edge to everything – a sort of fluffy, cushioned look to what was a sharp trim last autumn.

Everything in the nursery seems to be growing before our eyes and some species are coming into flower already – here’s the lovely but little used Osmanthus x burkwoodii with its pretty white flowers and very dark green leaves – a class act!

Osmanthus x burkwoodii

Osmanthus x burkwoodii

It’s a little tender so only really suitable for England, Wales, Channel Islands and France (sorry Scotland – country of my birth!).

June

 

Light evenings for more gardening

Now that the clocks have gone back we all know it’s Spring but actually it’s been mid-summer weather in parts of the country for a couple of weeks.  As well as being incredibly warm, it’s also been incredibly dry for all of February and all of March – two very dry months, when we are used to those months being wet, is not good news for new hedging.

The warm weather is also bringing out the weeds – tiny seedlings which can ruin a hedge if they are allowed to get established.

So, urgent gardening jobs for everyone who has recently planted a hedge are to clear the weeds and get out with the hose in the evenings, at least 3 times a week for at least 2 litres per plant unless it has rained heavily. It’s a pain but it’s got to be done. We’ll be relieved to see rain again.

June

PS Photo of a recent visitor to our garden – Charlie knew it wasn’t a normal garden bird and went absolutely mad! Apologies for the standard of photography – it was taken through a window.

Pheasant in the garden

Pheasant in the garden

 

 

Sea Buckthorn – not just for the sea-side

We were at Westonbirt on Sunday – glorious day and Charlie loves it there.  They do a very nice Sunday lunch (all the dog lovers sit outside eating Sunday lunch – quickly before it gets cold – with their gloves on!).

Westonbirt is the National Arboretum and it’s magnificent in all weathers, but especially in autumn when the national collection of Acers is at its best. There’s not a great deal to see there at the moment but we did notice some spectacular Sea Buckthorn hedges.

This is a very interesting plant and although it’s not well known, it has a lot of uses. It is very prickly and is great as a vandal proof barrier hedge – the thorns are hidden amongst the berries so it could take an intruder by surprise. The leaves are an attractive grey colour, which is a common colour for coastal plants. The berries are bright orange and there are loads of them – it makes a spectacular display in Winter and the berries are often retained throughout winter – as indeed they were at Westonbirt although it looked like birds had got most of them.

The berries are edible and nutritious (15 times more vitamin C than an orange according to Wikipedia) but bitter and oily – the oils are used in cosmetic production – and in China it is used a great deal as a herbal medicine for coughs, digestion, blood circulation and pain. There is talk of cancer fighting properties (all unproven at this stage).

It is resistant to salt spray so that explains it’s name but actually as long as it is grown in full sun it will grown in any soil other than heavy wet soils. It is used to stabilise river banks and on steep slopes, it’s good as a windbreak and its roots fix nitrogen in the soil so it’s of great use in poor soil areas.

We export to Northern Europe and to France but no further (we don’t like to supply any further south in case the plants don’t do well) but we keep receiving requests for Sea Buckthorn from Greece – you’d think there would be suppliers there – last week we got two enquiries both after large quantities. Tempting as it was (we like big orders!), we resisted. The wonders of Google!

Here are some photos – a close up of the new emerging berries on bronze stems and one showing the overall effect at this time of year of all the bronze growth – in a few weeks time the whole plant will look light grey – both really unusual colours for the garden.

close up image of Sea Buckthorn

close up image of Sea Buckthorn

Sea Buckthorn - view from distance

Sea Buckthorn – view from distance

And here’s one of Dave and Charlie standing by some lovely Dogwood – which was labelled as Alba but we think might have been Sibirica.

David Charlie and Dogwood

David Charlie and Dogwood

And here’s a link to Westonbirt:

http://www.forestry.gov.uk/westonbirt